To yield, to stop or to go – and how fast?

Marshal’s Office looks at reasons they write citations

Of the 1630 total citations written this year by the Camp Verde Marshal’s Office, 73 percent – 1187 citations – were written to motorists. (Adobe Stock Photo)

Of the 1630 total citations written this year by the Camp Verde Marshal’s Office, 73 percent – 1187 citations – were written to motorists. (Adobe Stock Photo)

CAMP VERDE – Over the next few years, the Arizona Department of Transportation will both start and finish multi-million dollar roadwork on SR 260 that includes roundabouts throughout Camp Verde.

Though community banter about the multiple traffic circles has been both positive and negative, one thing for certain is that folks won’t likely be stopped for speeding while in a roundabout.

Folks also won’t be stopping in same said roundabout.

Unless … “Many motorists are unfamiliar with the use of roundabouts and will come to a complete stop, instead of yielding to traffic,” says Sergeant Dan Jacobs of the Camp Verde Marshal’s Office.

“If no traffic is present, they can cautiously proceed. If traffic is present, they might need to come to a complete stop,” Jacobs says. “About the only other place they need not come to a complete stop is anywhere there is a yield sign. Drivers need to be aware that if they fail to yield and cause an accident, they can and will be cited accordingly. If they are entering a roadway from somewhere such as a private drive, they need to again, cautiously enter the roadway and yield to traffic already on the road.”

Whether locals or out-of-towners, the main reason motorists are cited in Camp Verde is for speeding, Jacobs says.

Camp Verde Marshal’s Office is not set up to track citations based on residency, Jacobs says. But from his own experience, the sergeant approximates about half of the office’s traffic stops and citations are locals.

Top-five citations for locals

Of the 1630 total citations written this year by the Camp Verde Marshal’s Office, 73 percent – 1187 citations – were written to motorists.

By his observation, Jacobs says the top five reasons local motorists are written citations in Camp Verde include:

1-speeding;

2-no proof of insurance;

3-stop sign or stop light violations;

4-failure to obey traffic control devices; and

5-no current registration.

Ask Deputy Dustin Richardson, and following too closely is a problem he regularly sees, one of the “biggest reasons” for traffic collisions.

“I can tell you that with speed, traffic control device and following too closely, the most common reason [or] excuse that I get from motorists is that ‘ I wasn’t paying attention,’” Richardson says. “My usual response to this is that if you weren’t paying attention and didn’t see the posted speed limit, stop sign or traffic control device, then what else aren’t you seeing when you’re traveling on the roadway?”

Top-five citations for out-of-towners

Says Jacobs, CVMO deputies hold both local and out-of-town motorists “to the same standards and will stop them if a traffic violation is observed, just as we would a Camp Verde resident.”

That said, Jacobs also says he is also inclined to “occasionally issue a written warning if it will have the same effect as a citation could have.”

“If someone is familiar with a certain roadway speed limits in Camp Verde and is knowingly violating the speed limit, a citation may have a greater impact on correcting that driver’s behavior,” says Jacobs.

By his observation, Jacobs says the top five reasons out-of-town motorists are written citations in Camp Verde include:

1-speeding;

2-failure to obey traffic control device;

3-failure to yield right of way; 

4-no proof of insurance; and

5-seatbelt violations.

Weather permitting

When it rains, it pours. The more inclement the weather, the more chance there is for some sort of traffic accident.

That’s one of the many reasons it’s important to keep a proper distance behind a moving vehicle, Jacobs says.

“The general rule of thumb is one car length for every 10 miles per hour (i.e. four car lengths for 40 miles per hour),” Jacobs says. “Road conditions could allow for a greater following distance. Conditions such as rain, snow, or low visibility especially require a greater following distance in order to safely stop. SR 260 between Camp Verde and Cottonwood is an area that we as deputies see a lot of blatant violations for speeding, tailgating, and unsafe passing.”

Jacobs says that CVMO follows Arizona Revised Statutes title 28, which can be found at http://law.justia.com/codes/arizona/2015/title-28.

-Follow Bill Helm on Twitter @BillHelm42 and on Facebook at @CampVerdeBugle

Comments

Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comment submissions may not exceed a 200 word limit, and in order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.